Oil & Gas

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For 40 years we've been delivering industry defining innovation throughout the lifecycle of onshore and offshore assets, optimising safety, spend and production.


Enhancing recovery from existing fields and exploiting new fields in difficult environments and uncertain market conditions present our oil and gas industry with many technical and economic challenges. We have the breadth and depth of expertise, the intellect and the drive to overcome these challenges and help our clients to realise the potential of these fields. 

Overcoming the challenges

We think like an operator; we’ve been working together with some of our clients for 40 years so we understand their goals and can share their vision.

It matters to us that:

> Safe and cost effective constructability and operability is inherent in concept selection, FEED and detailed design 
> New assets are future proofed for economic field development at a later stage if required  
> All risks and benefits in maintenance programs can be challenged in a single list to optimise operational spend
> Transfer from design, through operations, life extension and decommissioning is seamless
> Lessons learned on asset integrity management are fed back into design to optimise capital spend and reduce operational      expenditure

An independent view on concept selection
For any project, the most opportune time to make the biggest positive impact on project cost is early in the conceptual phase. Listening and exploring options with our clients, helping identify critical issues for optimising overall project economics at concept stage is where we add value. 

We aren’t trying to favor a particular type of structure, process or approach to subsea. We are concept neutral so it’s all about what works best for our client and their success.




Working as part of a global community with our clients, industry partners and academia, we are listening, imagining and co-creating the best solutions in:

Design and engineering of fixed and floating production facilities from foundation to flare tip, including subsea engineering and all associated project services. 

We embrace the increasingly complex challenges presented by high pressure, high temperature environments, aging assets, process optimisation, marginal fields and oil price fluctuations.

Design and engineering of onshore facilities, including LNG, pipelines, and all associated infrastructure and project services.
Reducing operating costs and maximising production through facilities analysis, design and engineering for all classes of assets. We focus on cost-effectively improving production, safety and reliability. 

We thrive on the technically challenging, innovative pieces of a project that add real value. We constantly look for new techniques and approaches, future trends and client needs to spot the opportunities where we can transform the seemingly impossible into the possible. 

We imagine and realise projects that go beyond code in order to maximise the potential of new and existing fields and to help move new technologies forward.

Our advanced modeling and analysis tools provide our clients with the highest levels of accuracy and confidence in our design and engineering deliverables. This certainty and accountability combined with the integrity of our experts means better judgement of priorities, confident decisions and optimisation of spend. 

Through our connections to a diverse range of experts, both within Atkins and with other industry and academic organisations, we bring diverse approaches and different ways of thinking together, helping us to better answer our clients’ challenges.


Karen Blanc
19 May 2016

Two weeks ago, I packed my baby's bag (we're still at the breastfeeding stage), and took him along with me to the judging sessions for WICE Mentor of the Year in London. I wasn't going to, but realised that if one of my mentees suggested that as a basis for not going, I'd tell them to think again. And for me, that's why I mentor: because it makes me a better person. Not in a "better than you" kind of way; in a way that being a parent turns you into the kind of person you want your kids to be. It encourages me to give my best in life, to go for the things I want to do, even if they're a stretch. (And how would I have ever known that my baby sleeps better on the train?) “Why do you mentor?” was the question posed to us during introductions at the Women in Construction and Engineering awards interview day in London last month. It’s a good question. Why do we mentor? Not to be the best at it, that’s for sure (though the recognition is of course very nice). Mentoring is all about other people, but of course there’s something in it for the mentors too. As a mentor I talk candidly about my own experiences, because my experience, my perspective, might help others. I’m often surprised when a mentee tells me something made sense to them because of what we’d spoken about. Of course I should know how

UK & Europe , Middle East , North America , Asia Pacific , Rest of World ,

Katherine Knight
29 Apr 2016

Carbon capture, storage and utilisation (CCUS) is something of a “buzz” technology at the moment. The recent cancellation of the CCS competition in the UK has made the headlines, the technology is making some progress in Canada and the USA, and is making leaps in the Middle East. Leaving aside others parts of the debate around this – particularly costs around limiting emissions harmful to the atmosphere and whether CCS is the panacea for decarbonising the energy system – I want to look at what’s positive about CCUS, and where it could be going. CCS is still an emerging technology and there are certainly lessons to be learned from other projects about what works and what doesn’t. Commercialising carbon capture technology is hugely important in order to get it up and running in more places around the world. Many of the CCS projects in operation or construction have low capture costs (they’re attached to natural gas processing facilities for example), are located close the area of storage so long distance transport of the CO₂ is not needed, and they can take advantage of revenue streams from the CO₂ (typically revenue from enhanced oil recovery (EOR) operations). A challenge for future projects is that one or all of these advantages may not be available, so those projects are likely to need greater financial incentives to be built. At the moment, government support is needed for CCS projects to get underway. This is happening in many places, and financial incentives are starting to play a greater

UK & Europe , Middle East , North America , Asia Pacific , Rest of World ,

Nick Roberts
18 Mar 2016

Competition is healthy. It keeps us sharp, agile and at the top of our game. But not everything in life is competitive and it is possible to have winners without having to have a loser. London versus the Northern Powerhouse increasingly seems to be debated, and more specifically over the last week this has extended to Crossrail 2 versus High Speed 3 with concerns raised that London gets a new railway whereas the North ‘only’ gets an upgrade to existing infrastructure. For me, it’s never been a choice between London or the Northern Powerhouse. It has to be both. It has to be about the growth of the UK. I’m not pretending that choices are easy but it’s an example of why the government created the National Infrastructure Commission, so they could take a long term, balanced and objective view of the country’s infrastructure needs in order to help make some of these decisions. I was pleased to see that in its first outputs the Commission proposed major schemes in both the North and London, and the Chancellor subsequently announced in the Budget that money will be made available to take forward key recommendations in both. Would I have liked the Budget to include more pump priming for the Northern Powerhouse, on a scale which would give it a real kick start rather than simply bringing forward investments that were planned already? Yes, but I wouldn’t go as far as saying that the North has got a raw deal. Let’s not

UK & Europe ,

Nick Roberts
16 Mar 2016

The National Infrastructure Commission was set up to take a long term and objective view of our infrastructure needs. The Chancellor’s agreement to take forward key recommendations such as HS3, the Trans-Pennine tunnel, the expansion of capacity on the M62 and Crossrail 2 shows that the system works. The creation of new and improved infrastructure is the means to the end, not the end itself, so the focus needs to be on delivering these schemes quickly in order to start generating the economic benefits we need now. Particularly in the case of the Northern Powerhouse, government spending on new and improved infrastructure will be vital in attracting much needed funding from other sources and delivering the productivity improvements that the government has set out. The influence of technology and data is enabling us to be smarter and more efficient in the way we use and deliver infrastructure. I welcome the funding and commitment to our digital economy and to make trials of driverless cars a reality on our roads by 2017, but would have liked to have seen more. I believe we have a real opportunity for the UK to lead the worldwide digital infrastructure revolution but we have to invest more in ensuring our infrastructure can keep up with the pace that technology is developing and evolving.

UK & Europe ,

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Atkins’ oil and gas team was the engineering contractor providing technical support for the Solan subsea oil storage tank project. Beginning in 2008, the highly skilled group of engineers were involved in each step of the Solan project from concept development work, through to Front-End Engineering Design (FEED) and then detailed design work in 2012-2013. Work was completed for client Premier Oil in 2014, after more than five years. The Solan subsea oil storage tank sits in around 135m of water and can store 300,000 barrels of oil equivalent; it is 25m high, has a foot print of 45m x 45m and is constructed from 10,000 tonnes of steel.

UK ,

Our oil and gas team in Perth successfully completed the FEED work for Apache Energy for a large gas compression facility in the north-west of Australia.A multidisciplinary team worked closely with Apache to develop the chosen concept and optimise the layout, based on a modular construction philosophy. This was a key driver for Apache; a design which would maximise off-site fabrication and construction, and minimise the amount of on-site installation work in order to reduce the overall project risk. A 3D model using PDMS (Plant Design Management System) was created, developed and reviewed on a regular basis, both internally and with Apache. This allowed ongoing, interactive discussions between various engineering disciplines as the design progressed, leading to a well-defined concept for taking into detailed design.

Australia ,

The first liquefied natural gas terminal (LNG) to be established in China was developed in the Guangdong province. It was set up to provide a more reliable source of energy and provide environmental benefits through the reduction of air pollution by replacing coal burning power stations. Atkins was appointed to act as international consultants on the project. The role included providing environmental input at the design stage, undertaking an environmental and social impact assessment study for government approval, and carrying out a comprehensive risk assessment.

China ,

Atkins is an official engineering services provider to the UK’s National Composites Centre (NCC). The NCC brings together companies and academics to develop new technologies for the design and rapid manufacture of high-quality composite products.Atkins is supporting the NCC in advancing the use of this material across sectors, including aerospace, power generation, highways, transportation and the built environment. Atkins draws on its expertise in innovative applications of composite materials, including manufacturing and testing, and its multi-disciplinary experience to support the NCC in providing guidance to organisations and individuals that approach the centre with a composites concept.

UK ,

Atkins is researching the elastic response of aerofoils made of composite materials under aerodynamic and inertial forces. The methods being derived will have multiple applications and feature generic modules covering stiffness, inertia and rotational loading. In addition, the derived analysis model has a rapid sizing capability, allowing multiple configurations to be evaluated at the concept stage. This will reduce development lead times and therefore help accelerate the development of more energy efficient structures. Advanced composite materials have multiple potential applications across engineering, many of which could play an important part in sustainable development. For example, wind turbine blades made of composite materials are lighter and so require lighter supporting structures and less fuel to transport them to site, as well as being more aerodynamic because they require fewer bolts and rivets to be constructed. However, the understanding of the behaviour of advanced composites is, in relative terms, in its infancy. Atkins has coupled its in-depth knowledge of the latest composite materials with its multi-disciplinary experience to develop and deliver a research programme designed to help harness the full potential of advanced composites. In this way, Atkins’ advanced composites research programme is making a significant contribution to Carbon Critical Design.

India , UK ,

To take advantage of the additional oil and gas reserves in the Valhall field, BP Norway has invested in a new Production and Hotel (PH) platform. Atkins provided technical support to address the working environment aspects of the PH platform during the detailed design phase and continues to provide support during the current construction phase. There is a strong focus on user involvement and good design of the working environment. Atkins staff provided expertise in this area during the detailed design and construction phases of the project, in an integrated design and assurance role. Atkins’ client Mustang Engineering (part of the Wood Group) is responsible for the platform topsides (process area). Atkins staff carried out working environment activities in accordance with NORSOK standards to ensure compliance with the rigorous working environment standards set by the customer, BP Norway.

Norway ,

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