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Atkins focuses on improving environmental management performance, risk and liability management and competitiveness for its clients, helping to deliver savings and efficiencies in time, cost and resources.

About

It is widely recognised that our planet’s resources are limited, that our ecosystems are at risk of being damaged further or even destroyed and that climate change poses a real threat to both the existing and future built and natural environment.

Holistic approach

A holistic, long term approach to assessment and solutions based on a sound understanding of the complex interactions between economic, social and environmental issues is essential if sustainable outcomes are to be achieved. The early integration of sustainability considerations into a policy, plan or project development process is also critical to ensuring a long term liveable future.

As well as being one of the largest and most successful international environmental consultancies, Atkins also supports a liveable future by providing environmentally-led infrastructure consultancy. We drive adaptation of the natural and built environment in the face of complex environmental change and development demand, ensuring the balanced management and protection of our natural and heritage assets.

Ensuring enhanced environmental performance

Our global network of experts is on the cutting edge of the international climate change debate and advises governments on policies and methodologies to adapt and mitigate its impact. We help businesses respond to these new government measures as well as proactively driving the journey to a low carbon economy.

We help organisations to improve their competitiveness through enhanced environmental performance and better management of risk and liability as well as to pursue opportunities in a growing environmental industry.

We can draw on our full range of in-house technical specialists in environmental science, ecology, noise, land quality, waste, air quality, water, geotechnics and tunnelling, social-economics and community issues, landscape, heritage and urban design to provide bespoke and holistic solutions for the environmental, social and economic success of your policy or scheme.

FEATURES

Expertise

We focus on improving environmental management performance, risk and liability management and competitiveness, helping to deliver savings and efficiencies in time, cost and resources.

Our environmental expertise covers a wide range of experience in the following areas:

Sustainability and environmental consultancy

We provide a comprehensive range of services to help public and private sector organisations to characterise, quantify and manage their relationship with the natural and regulatory environment, helping us to live within our environmental, economic and social limits and to prepare for a changing climate.

Learn more about our expertise in sustainability and environmental consultancy

Air quality

We provide everything from ministerial advice on matters of national air quality strategy to indoor air quality advice to resolve disputes between tenants and landlords.

Learn more about our expertise in air quality

Ecology

Our team of more than 70 ecologists provides ecological assessment, interpretation and solutions for management, development and infrastructure projects of all sizes across terrestrial, freshwater, marine, and coastal environments.

Learn more about our expertise in ecology

Waste management

Atkins supports both public and private sector clients in meeting increasing domestic and international regulatory drivers as well as reducing the business cost of managing and disposing of waste.

Learn more about our expertise in waste management

Remediation and land quality

We are a leading consultancy in the area of geo-environmental engineering and contaminated land management, providing integrated solutions to our clients and other professionals working in the field of land transactions and land development.

Learn more about our expertise in remediation and land quality

Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA)

We have the experts to deliver all stages of the EIA process, whether that be undertaking the entire EIA, or assisting at one or more of the key stages. We support the EIA with specialists from all of the relevant environmental topic areas such as noise, air quality, water, ecology, landscape and heritage, as well as with technical experts experienced in all of the major infrastructure and developments sectors, such as urban development, energy, waste, water and transport.

Learn more about our international expertise in Environmental Impact Assessment

Learn more about our expertise in Environmental Impact Assessment in the UK

Climate change and carbon consultancy

We provide sustainable solutions to climate change issues in the built and natural environment, designing structures and producing plans that are robust in the face of future climate change and that realise their full mitigation potential through our carbon management capability.

Learn more about our expertise in climate change and carbon consultancy

Acoustics, noise and vibration

Our experience ranges from regulatory compliance for large industrial schemes to acoustic enhancement design for complex underground transport interchanges and education environments.

Learn more about our expertise in acoustics, noise and vibration

Angles

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Claire Wansbury
09 Jan 2017

The government had previously committed support to seven garden cities. The change in policy is to draw in smaller developments, each delivering between 1,500 and 10,000 new homes. It is easy to assume that these ‘village’ developments must, by definition, be smaller scale than the garden cities originally envisaged by Howard, but in reality the largest will be similar in numbers of dwellings to Howard’s original theoretical proposals.   A key challenge in delivering the quality of living spaces envisaged under the garden cities movement comes from the density of each development. Howard’s vision involved cities supporting 32,000 people across 2,400 hectares. In modern developments the density of dwellings is far higher.   In any new garden village, the greenspaces should be multi-functional, benefitting human health, social cohesion, wildlife, and flood management. The benefits that people gain from the natural environment are termed ecosystem services. Obvious examples include food and fuel, but less obvious benefits are provided by services such as pollination and the contribution natural habitats make to flood control. Some of these services are effectively ‘free goods’, which people benefit from without paying for them overtly – the cost only becomes apparent when an ecosystem is degraded and the service declines. Ecosystem services valuation attempts to take account of these services in cost-benefit analysis. Some services can be valued by direct pricing (e.g. food and fuel); others are valued by proxy, such as willingness to pay for recreational use or the increase in house prices in areas with green space. True

UK & Europe ,

Sam Stephens
23 Dec 2016

When thinking about this question, many will answer by saying that technologies like energy storage, solar PV and electric cars will have the biggest impact in reducing climate change risks over the next decade. While all these technologies have grown exponentially over the last decade and will revolutionise our energy system over the next ten years, it is difficult to focus on one solution that will deliver the change required on its own. Because focusing on the solutions ignores the real problem; to me there is not a question of what we should be delivering, but how we should be delivering it. I genuinely believe all the tools are at our disposal now to tackle climate change head on, and since Paris 2015 there is even the political will to let it happen. The challenge now is joining up the problems with the engineering solutions and the finance to pay for them, on a scale large enough to make the impact we need. In this respect the most important technological development that will have the greatest impact on reducing climate change risks is the emergence of the Decentralised Autonomous Organisation or DAO. The concept of a DAO is still in its early stages, but is moving forward quickly. Its routes are heavily linked to the development of the Bitcoin cryptocurrency, but also draws upon trends such as crowd-sourcing, crowd-funding and the gig economy. For example, while not recognised as a DAO, JumpStartFund provided the incentives and platform for around 100 experts

Group , UK & Europe , Middle East , North America , Asia Pacific , Rest of World ,

Claire Wansbury
22 Dec 2016

Having enjoyed the whole series, I was delighted to see the recognition of our wild urban neighbours received in the final episode. I was particularly pleased to see the peregrine falcon feature as, for those of us in the UK at least, such inspiring programmes can sometimes leave the viewer with a feeling that all the ‘proper’ wildlife is somewhere else, only accessible to them through the television. While the programme showed us the surprising resilience of nature, there were also plenty of examples where human’s impact on the world has been too drastic for species to adapt to, making survival increasingly difficult. Looking around London, it is essential to also recognise and celebrate the fact that making space for nature benefits the people of the city as well as the wild animals that colonise our green spaces. This is being increasingly recognised by industry, as well as policy makers, but we still have a lot of work to do. As part of the London Assembly’s inquiry into the future of the capital's parks this year Atkins’ contribution of evidence found that parks are still thought of as a cost rather than natural capital assets, despite increasing evidence of the many benefits they deliver to society and the economy. For real change, and in order to protect our natural assets in a time of a housing crisis and economic constraints, we need to measure the value natural spaces contribute to our cities in a more tangible way.  Earlier this year I was part of

UK & Europe ,

Neil Manthorpe
05 Dec 2016

With green space and public health so closely entwined, we must focus more funding towards increasing the quantity and accessibility of our green spaces. If we don’t act on this then public health is likely to worsen. Lack of movement is now the fourth leading risk factor for death according to the World Health Organisation and while we’re all familiar with the recommended 30 minutes of exercise five times a week, 37 per cent of men and 45 per cent of women aren’t achieving this. I believe this is mainly due to lack of opportunity, and that if more cycle routes and walkways were in place people would find it easier to incorporate their recommended daily amount of activity into their lives. With the incorporation of this regular exercise able to directly reduce the risk of strokes, cardiovascular disease, obesity, some cancers and type 2 diabetes, investing in green infrastructure (GI) and green space is an extremely worthwhile effort and gives us returns far greater than the investment it requires.  Atkins has been at the forefront of delivering GI for the past 30 years, opening up access to all the benefits that green space and connections can provide. A project I’m proud to be involved in is the creation of a network of cycle routes across the London Borough of Kingston. These routes will drastically improve connectivity across the borough for cyclists and provide a safe alternative to driving, benefiting residents and improving the liveability of Kingston.  While GI needs to be a country

UK & Europe ,

Projects

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In conjunction with the U.S. Army Corp of Engineers, Charleston District, Atkins will prepare the environmental impact statement (EIS) in order to evaluate the project’s potential socioeconomic and natural environmental impacts. Conducted over a period of 5 to 6 years, the EIS will address numerous issues such as sea level rise, scenery impacts, protected species and habitat, socioeconomic issues, transportation impacts, noise and vibration, and air quality. The wharf will encompass more than 2 miles, with the ability to manage eight design vessels at full buildout. The expansive size of this project could impact approximately 54 acres of tidal salt marsh and bottomland hardwood wetlands, where threatened and endangered species exist. Among these and several other issues, Atkins will evaluate the project’s impact and develop ways to mitigate the environmental effects. Developed jointly by the port authorities of Georgia and South Carolina, this bi-state owned and operated marine container terminal will aid projected growth for containerized cargo for a minimum of 25 years and is expected to support economic development in the region, including adding billions in tax revenue and upwards of 1 million jobs.

USA ,

The primary tools for controlling and treating stormwater are referred to as stormwater best management practices (BMPs). BMPs include features such as detention ponds, rain gardens, and swales, which slow and treat stormwater as it moves through the system, helping to reduce flood risk during storms and also improve water quality. To help the city decide where BMPs should be placed for the best results, Atkins worked with Bonita Springs to develop the BMP Assessment Tool (BAT). The tool allows the city to simulate various scenarios for placing BMPs throughout the stormwater drainage system. Using a rainfall/runoff algorithm, the tool estimates pollutant loads across the network for each scenario, supporting informed decision-making on which BMPs to implement and where to place them. A challenge in evaluating pollutant levels is estimating the amount of directly connected impervious areas (DCIA) in a community. These areas include buildings, driveways, parking lots, and roads that contribute to high concentrations of pollution. Traditionally, the way to accurately estimate DCIA is to use aerial imagery—an expensive and labor-intensive process many communities cannot afford. The BAT uses a new process of “virtualizing” DCIA by interpreting available road and parcel databases to simulate its likely location, producing a more accurate (and less costly) estimate of DCIA than traditional land use-based methods. By creating what-if scenarios, based on existing conditions and proposed BMP plans, the city was able to reach consensus on their citywide BMP plan. The plan includes a new multi-million dollar park project, which will improve recreation

USA , North America ,

Rather than repair and maintain the refuge in its existing form (an artificial freshwater habitat), the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service determined the best solution was to return the habitat back to its original state as a salt/brackish marsh. Before active management, the refuge was diked and managed into four freshwater impoundments that cover more than 10,000 acres. Atkins identified sustainable solutions by addressing the necessary repairs and developed the steps necessary to allow the refuge to revert to a salt and brackish marsh. We generated a hydrodynamic and numerical model of the refuge and the adjacent bay region using Delft3D modeling software to account for the effects of tides, wind, waves, and the mixing of fresh and salt water. Our staff of technical, scientific, and industry experts conceived a design that incorporated existing features with new ones in a way that balanced theory and constructability. This project led to the creation of an established Atkins model for habitat restoration and flood-proofing for coastal developments facing sea level rise. By incorporating sustainable design into natural and manmade features, such as conveyance channels, this model is a “next-step” approach to basic marsh-fill designs and may provide resource benefits to recent re-nourishment projects along the gulf coast. The refuge’s design serves as a model for effective management of coastal erosion from sea level rise—applicable to many other areas along the U.S. coastline. The project received the 2016 Environmental Excellence Silver Award from the World Organization of Dredging Associations (WODA) in its

USA , North America ,

We have been working with Kincardine Offshore Windfarm Limited (KOWL) since 2013 as an active member of the development team. We are developing one of the world’s first arrays of floating wind turbines by 2020 which will establish a leading position for Scotland in the development and deployment of this novel technology. This will be a pilot-scale demonstrator offshore wind farm utilising a semi-spar floating foundation technology, which will demonstrate the technological and commercial feasibility of floating offshore wind. Floating foundations open the possibility for future offshore wind farms to be located further from shore in deeper waters, minimising visual impacts whilst accessing hitherto untapped wind resources. The wind farm will have the capacity to provide 218GWhr of electricity which is the equivalent to powering over 55,000 homes in Scotland, and will see a reduction of over 94,000 tonnes of CO2 compared to fossil fuelled power sources. We have taken the Project from initial concept design to pre-consent determination. The journey has been significant and challenging, and was made possible by our in-house expertise in marine environmental assessment and consenting. The marine and coastal team provided a ‘one stop shop’ for the licensing and assessment of the Project including: Environmental Scoping Assessment Environmental Baseline Studies and Reports Environmental Impact Assessment and Environmental Statement Habitat Regulations Assessment  Bird Collision Risk Modelling Marine Licence and Section 36 Applications

UK ,

We helped the Environment Agency to deliver a beach management scheme at Dawlish Warren at the mouth of the Exe Estuary, with an estimated total project cost of over £14 million.   Dawlish Warren is an important wildlife site, designated as a Site of Special Scientifc Interest, Special Protection Area, Special Area of Conservation, a Ramsar wetland of international importance and local nature reserve. A key challenge was to enhance the role the sand spit plays as a flood defence to the Exe Estuary but not impact on the conservation features for which it was designated. We were involved in all stages of the scheme including: strategy, project appraisal, outline design, Preliminary Environmental Information Report, detailed design and Environmental Impact Assessment. Dawlish Warren Beach Management Scheme Our key marine and coastal environment services included: Specifcation and management and analysis of required marine surveys, including ecology, UXO and bathymetry Wave, plume and tidal modelling and reporting Water Framework Directive assessment Habitat Regulations Assessment Environmental Impact Assessment Coastal impact study Stakeholder engagement (including 3D printed model of the scheme). The scheme will involve the removal of gabions from the beach to re-mobilise the dunes, beach nourishment using sediment from subtidal sandbanks, repair of groynes to help control the nourishment and development of monitoring and management plans. Used with permission of copyright owner, Environment Agency

UK ,

Atkins has been awarded the contract for the Turkey National Transport Masterplan, to collect traffic data across the country, develop a transport model and identify key transport infrastructure investment projects over the next 30 years. Although the work will be led by Transportation, the project win was a result of a collaborative effort between the Transportation and Water Ground and Environment teams at the bid stage. Funded by EuropeAid, the work on the project will also include providing expertise on how the Ministry of Transport, Maritime Affairs and Communication in Turkey and other institutions need to change so they are able to deliver the infrastructure investment as successfully as possible. Atkins are collaborating with lead partner Egis, who have already been working with the Turkish government in the early development phase. The team, built a relationship with Egis ahead of the bid, and unrivalled skills in transportation were a good fit with Egis’ capabilities. This project win gives Atkins the opportunity to build durable client relations and capitalise on a project of huge significance for Turkey in the longer term. In addition to building a national transport model for the country which will be used to forecast travel projections, the team are assisting with components of the Masterplan Strategy, with a particular focus on Intelligent Transport Systems and Air Transport and Navigation. The work also involves utilising the outcomes of the National Masterplan to inform the development of guidelines for Urban Transportation plans. Atkins are leading on this element of the project. As

Turkey ,

Atkins was lead consultant on a demanding project to upgrade Belfast’s ageing Victorian sewer system. One of the largest infrastructure projects to be undertaken in Northern Ireland, the scheme had to contend with high volume stormwater flow and challenging geology. The scale of the project was immense, including the construction of 9.5km of tunnels, 21 access shafts and a pumping station housed in Belfast's deepest and largest excavation. We provided project management, planning, preliminary design, contract supervision and administration to improve water quality in the River Lagan. The new infrastructure means that the Belfast sewers are now able to deal with a one in 30 year storm event, an event magnitude that has since become an industry standard.

UK ,

In the early 1960s, Birmingham New Street Station was originally rebuilt to accommodate 60,000 passengers a day and the concrete station came to represent the city of Birmingham for many travellers. The redesign of Birmingham New Street has transformed the reinforced concrete station into a futuristic transport hub. In 2008, Network Rail awarded Atkins the detailed design (GRIP 5) for Birmingham New Street, where up to 170,000 passengers now travel through the station each day. Over seven years, Atkins played a lead role in the design of the station and the shopping centre Grand Central, overcoming significant challenges by applying innovative solutions to help successfully deliver one of the biggest station refurbishments in Europe. The project involved the assessment of existing structures and the design of new ones including the stainless steel façade, new atrium roof and the steel framed John Lewis structure, which is built partly over the 1965 reinforced concrete station. This entailed the building of a Global Stability Analysis Model (GSAM), to understand how the old station and the new constructions would behave under different loadings, both in its final

UK ,

Products

READY TO DIG

Ready to dig  

Atkins is the UK’s leading provider of utility reports. We also provide a wide range of utility management services across the lifecycle of a project.
www.utilitymanagementsolutions.co.uk/readytodig/

Locations

For more information on our work and experience in this sector please contact:

UK & Europe

Peter Williams
Divisional director
United Kingdom
Tel: +44 121 483 5000
Email

Christina Leafe
Director
United Kingdom
Tel: +44 121 483 5000
Email 

 

North America

United States of America
Tel: +1 800 477 7275
Email

   

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