We provide complete solutions to clients operating in the metro and light rail markets. From the Dubai Metro to the London Underground, we plan, design and enable surface and sub-surface transit systems.

In the early 1960s, Birmingham New Street Station was originally rebuilt to accommodate 60,000 passengers a day and the concrete station came to represent the city of Birmingham for many travellers. The redesign of Birmingham New Street has transformed the reinforced concrete station into a futuristic transport hub.

In 2008, Network Rail awarded Atkins the detailed design (GRIP 5) for Birmingham New Street, where up to 170,000 passengers now travel through the station each day.

Over seven years, Atkins played a lead role in the design of the station and the shopping centre Grand Central, overcoming significant challenges by applying innovative solutions to help successfully deliver one of the biggest station refurbishments in Europe.

The project involved the assessment of existing structures and the design of new ones including the stainless steel façade, new atrium roof and the steel framed John Lewis structure, which is built partly over the 1965 reinforced concrete station. This entailed the building of a Global Stability Analysis Model (GSAM), to understand how the old station and the new constructions would behave under different loadings, both in its final state and during key stages of the construction programme.

Working closely with Network Rail and Mace, Atkins drew upon their range of multidisciplinary specialists, from civils, highways and architecture, to modelling, telecoms, landscaping and project management to deliver the design for this extraordinary project.

The station was officially reopened on September 20, 2015.

 
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Atkins has won a contract as lead consultant and masterplanner to develop the Asia Aerospace City (AAC) in Subang, Malaysia into a world class facility for the aerospace industry. The development will be designed as a smart city with cutting edge research and development facilities, integrated office suites, academic facilities, a convention centre and a hotel. Spread over a 30-acre site the campus is located near Subang Airport in Kuala Lumpur.

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Malaysia, Group,

Taiyuan Wusu airport is located to the southeast of Taiyuan which is the capital city of Shanxi Province and its political, economic and cultural centre. In ancient times, Taiyuan was an important military town but it is now one of China’s most important centres of heavy industry, using more than half the nation’s coal output.

Fundamental to the planning for this new terminal was maintaining the efficient relationship between the terminal and the flight area. Also, the terminal zone had to satisfy the demands of both short term and long term operation.

A building form angled at 45 degrees was used to develop the character of the site. By join­ing the new main building and its gate piers to the existing terminal, this makes it a visual as well as a functional part of the entire complex. The existing building and the new extension merge around three courtyards that are evocative of traditional Shanxi courtyards.

The courtyards are open internal spaces bringing light and air into the centre of the plan where they can be appreciated by domestic and international passengers.

China,

Atkins was appointed in 2011 as lead designer for the expansion of King Abdulaziz International Airport in Jeddah.

The 36-month project involves designing a new 640,000 m² passenger terminal and associated buildings to increase the airport’s capacity to 30 million passengers each year.

In addition to lead design activities, we are undertaking the architectural, special airport systems (SAS) and information and communication technology (ICT) design for all aspects of the terminal building, including an advanced baggage handling system, departure gates and airway bridges, a 56-room hotel for transit passengers, four first class lounges and a business lounge and duty-free shops and commercial centres.

The airport expansion is needed as Saudi Arabia seeks to meet demand from religious tourism to the holy city of Mecca. Approximately 2.5 million people visit Mecca during the Hajj period alone, and this is projected to rise to 4 million in the next few years.

Kingdom of Saudi Arabia,

The design provides a contemporary station which responds to both site and a sustainable agenda. The asymmetrical nature of the station can also be oriented to work with the solar path and therefore minimise solar gain.

The form of the station has been specifically designed to allow passive smoke exhaust from the trains. This reduces both capital and operational costs but, most importantly, the stations impact on the environment.

Kuwait,

Atkins completed the design and construction administration of the new Mahogany Bay cruise terminal development—a themed destination retail village comprising 17 discrete buildings and incorporating a multimodal center to support vehicle transfers.

This innovative project included 20 acres of waterfront property developed to serve as an attraction for tourists and the community. It honors the local history and building design.

The Mahogany Bay Destination Cruise Center serves as a gateway for more than 500,000 passengers annually—quadruple the number of passengers that arrived prior to the completion of this development.

The project was recognized as the Best New Cruise Destination Port by Porthole Cruise Magazine in 2010.

Honduras,

A joint Atkins/Arup team undertook one of the largest and most important elements of the Crossrail project - the detailed design of the major twin tunnels to be bored beneath central London.

The tunnels are 6.2m internal diameter, at depths of up to 37m. Eight TBMs were used to construct the tunnels - six Earth Pressure Balance Machines (EPB) and two Slurry Machines - to cater for differing ground conditions. The tunnels are lined with 250,000 Precast Concrete Segments. Tapered tunnel rings with 8 segments were designed to accommodate the minimum track alignment radius. The majority of the tunnel segments are steel fibre reinforced and include poly-propylene fibre for fire protection. Segment joints are designed with locating dowels to facilitate high quality build ensuring good waterproofing performance and long term durability. Curved geometry on the segment joints is included to improve performance and protect the segment. There are a total of 18 cross passages along the bored tunnels length, constructed in a variety of linings, including insitu concrete, pre cast SGI and sprayed concrete.

Some of the most challenging conditions were faced on the central tunnels which pass beneath the two major financial districts, the City of London and Canary Wharf, where water bearing sand lenses were encountered. EPB TBMs were driven in parallel with station constructions which required TBM arrival, transit and re-launch systems to be developed.

One of the biggest challenges of the tunnelling works under central London was protection of the vast network of existing third party utilities, tunnels, structures, railways and historical buildings. Atkins' engineers seconded into the Crossrail project have been responsible for the damage assessment and the design of mitigation to protect third party assets from settlement induced damage. The assessments were undertaken in accordance with a robust phased approach to ensure consistency with focus placed on the most sensitive structures.

Timely resolution of concerns with stakeholders and third parties was key to securing “letters of no objection” to allow construction to progress. The extensive third party asset information assembled during the design phase was carefully managed and organised, allowing it to be integrated as a key data set into the Crossrail’s BIM system.

Over 3,400 buildings, 640 structures (including London Underground tunnels and other rail assets) and up to 14,000 utilities (gas, sewer and water mains) have been assessed to date. As part of the project management team, our engineers continue to advise the client on all issues relating to third party asset protection, accounting for the actual works being undertaken and the ground response on site.

Atkins was also awarded the architectural component contract for all the stations and associated structures. This award covers the design and specification of interior elements such as the wall and ceiling finishes, cladding systems, seating, lighting and wayfinding.

Upon completion the line is expected to carry 72,000 passengers per hour through 40 stations travelling from Reading and Heathrow in the west, to Shenfield and Abbey Wood in the east.

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Atkins is behind the long-term masterplan for the new Medina Airport and has also developed designs for the terminal to facilitate the growth of domestic, international and Hajj traffic.

The scope of work, on a full multidisciplinary basis, included masterplanning, terminal design, surface access planning, sustainability strategy, and layouts for the runway, taxiway and aprons.

The terminal was designed for 18 million passengers per annum with expansion up to 30 million. The masterplan also made provision for the later development of a second terminal. Our designs fit with Saudi Arabia’s desire to vastly improve the traveller experience as they make their pilgrimage.

Kingdom of Saudi Arabia,

Cadre International TOD Centre (ITC) will be the iconic landmark development in the East Guangzhou area. The 251,531 square metre mixed-use development integrates a number of transportation and will be a major attraction to visitors, interchanging passengers and the people working or living in the towers and will be a showcase Transport Orientated Design (TOD) development. The connections between the transportation hub, the commercial functions on the site and the surrounding environments have been optimized to ensure an efficient people flow that benefits the passengers and the commercial facilities on site. The landmark architecture integrated with the TOD design will ensure Cadre International TOD Centre (ITC) will be a celebrated attraction that is renowned worldwide.


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China,

The Thameslink Programme at Farringdon Station aims to create an environment that meets the present and future needs of rail operators, passengers, staff and the local community.

Atkins was appointed as the detailed designer to help Network Rail accommodate longer trains and increase passenger throughput. We were also commissioned by London Underground, who owns the station, to provide concept and detailed design for the associated station entrances and integrated ticket hall, as well as the respective concourses and platforms.

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UK,

Meixi Lake represents a sustainable city model, now in its implementation phase. Located to the west of Changsha City, Meixi Lake is positioned to be 'the future centre of Hexi City' with an expected population of 206,000 people.

Atkins’ masterplan embodies the spirit and objectives of an ecological city, maximising opportunities through transport infrastructure, promoting a development strategy of high density core areas (TOD – Transit Oriented Development), a new CBD, as well as seven character districts, all to be implemented over the evolutionary life of the development.

China,

The Lusail Light Railway Transit (LRT) System project is part of the overall Lusail project being developed by Qatari Diar to create a new city of 200,000 people on a land of 35 square kilometres north of Doha. 

The vision is to create an integrated transportation system to serve the visitors, employees and residents of Lusail plus provide opportunities to create a more dynamic urban environment.

Atkins is responsible for the preliminary designs and drafting the BOQ for the following elements of the project: depot and OCC; overground stations; underground stations; at-grade LRT.

In addition to the above we are providing expert advice on all fire and life safety issues in establishing the appropriate fire strategy for the stations and depot, and assisting the client in liaising with the Qatar Civil Defence Department.

Qatar,

The new terminal for Xi'an airport in central China will provide an additional 270,000 square metres of space. When the airport expansion is complete the anticipated passenger volume will be 31 million per year.

Our competition winning design for the new terminal building suggests a connection to the formality of traditional Chinese architecture. The three dimensional form is inspired by the architectural style of the Han and Tang dynasties where the sculptural roof rises in symmetrical layers towards a central axis.

China,